Egyptians Amongst the Suspects in the Benghazi Attack

Remember when everyone was heralding the Arab Spring?  It was supposed to render al-Qaeda and its affiliates obsolete because young Arabs learned a new way to address their grievances?  That seems like a distant memory, what with the Muslim Brotherhood in control in Egypt and now this news.  –AA

By Catherine Herridge

The list of suspects in the Libya terror attack now extends to a handful of suspected militants aligned with an Egyptian group known as the Jamal Network, Fox News has learned. 

A U.S. official said the Jamal Network is committed to violence to attain its political ambitions, adding they are “hard-core, violent extremists in Egypt who are trying to develop a relationship with Al Qaeda.” 

Fox News is told that there are between two- and three-dozen suspects actively being investigated at any one time in connection with the Benghazi attack. The suspect list is fluid, drawn from intelligence ranging from intercepts to witness accounts, with new names being added and dropped on a regular basis. 

The majority of the suspects were described to Fox News as “locals” who come from Libya and are followers of the group Ansar al-Shariah, which wants to establish an Islamic state with adherence to strict Shariah law. 

The additional suspects are being investigated after one Tunisian suspect, Ali Ani al-Harzi, was first arrested in Turkey — after being identified through telephone intercepts where he bragged to friends about his involvement — and transferred to Tunisian custody. There is also at least one suspect with ties to Al Qaeda in Iraq. 

The radical ties of the suspects further raises questions about the degree of planning that may have been involved in an attack initially described as “spontaneous.” 

The Jamal Network takes its name from Mohammed Jamal Abu Ahmed, who was released from an Egyptian jail during the Arab Spring and is now trying to establish himself as a leader in Jihadi circles. U.S. officials believe he established training camps in Libya, and it was in these camps that some of the fighters linked to the attack were trained. 

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