Stratfor: The American Public’s Indifference to Foreign Affairs

Excellent commentary on how we are increasingly insular when it comes to world events.

By George Friedman

Last week, several events took place that were important to their respective regions and potentially to the world. Russian government officials suggested turning Ukraine into a federation, following weeks of renewed demonstrations in Kiev. The Venezuelan government was confronted with violent and deadly protests. Kazakhstan experienced a financial crisis that could have destabilized the economies of Central Asia. Russia and Egypt inked a significant arms deal. Right-wing groups in Europe continued their political gains

Any of these events had the potential to affect the United States. At different times, lesser events have transfixed Americans. This week, Americans seemed to be indifferent to all of them. This may be part of a cycle that shapes American interest in public affairs. The decision to raise the debt ceiling, which in the last cycle gripped public attention, seemed to elicit a shrug.

The Primacy of Private Affairs

The United States was founded as a place where private affairs were intended to supersede public life. Public service was intended less as a profession than as a burden to be assumed as a matter of duty — hence the word “service.” There is a feeling that Americans ought to be more involved in public affairs, and people in other countries are frequently shocked by how little Americans know about international affairs or even their own politics.

Read more: The American Public’s Indifference to Foreign Affairs | Stratfor
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1 Comment

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One response to “Stratfor: The American Public’s Indifference to Foreign Affairs

  1. Kev Cali

    FYI: WordPress E-mail shows up in spam folder

    On Tue, Feb 18, 2014 at 1:24 PM, Anthony Amore

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