About

Anthony Amore is an expert in security matters, especially those related to homeland security and cultural property protection.  Presently he is Director of Security at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, where he is charged with the ongoing efforts to recover thirteen works of art stolen from the museum on March 18, 1990.  His work as security director has been highlighted in the book Art and Crime: Exploring the Dark Side of the Art World (Praeger, 2009), which describes him as “among the most innovative, and most effective, museum security directors in the world.”

Amore’s work as an art theft investigator has been lauded in the Boston Herald and The Gardner Heist: The True Story of the World’s Largest Unsolved Art Theft (Smithsonian, 2009).

Amore has fifteen years of national security, law, intelligence, and crisis management experience with federal government agencies: the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)’s Security Division.  He is currently a lecturer in homeland security at Fisher College.

Amore was instrumental in the reorganization and regionalization of national homeland security efforts post-September 11th and was the agency’s lead agent responding to the attempted terrorist attack by Richard Reid, the so-called “Shoe Bomber” in December 2001. At the TSA, Amore was nominated by his superiors for a Service to America Medal in 2002 and 2003.

Anthony is also the president of a private security consulting firm, Boston Security Associates.

He blogs regularly for The Huffington Post and has been a columnist with the Boston Herald, writing a bi-weekly column titled “Security Brief.”

NEW!  You can order Anthony’s book, Stealing Rembrandts: The Untold Stories of Notorious Art Heists, by visiting amazon.com or clicking here.

Contact Anthony at anthonyamore@hotmail.com